Friends of the Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge
A group of citizens from all over the United States have banded together to form a support group. Many members are out-of-state residents who winter on the gulf. The organization functions primarily as an advocacy group, making telephone calls and writing letters as needed. It also functions as a non-profit private organization to accept donations and land to improve the refuge and to increase wildlife habitat.

Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge
Covering nearly 7,000 acres, the Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge is home to beaches, sand dunes, scrub forests, fresh and saltwater marshes, freshwater swamps and uplands. It is home to hundreds of species including the endangered beach mouse and nesting sea turtles, as well as a critical stopover point for neo-tropical migrant birds passing through in spring and fall.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
The Daphne Field Service office provides services to private citizens, federal and state agency clientele seeking federal or state approvals, state organizations, local governments, schools, and other educational and community groups. Their goal is to inform the public about fish and wildlife resource issues.

Sea Turtle Conservancy

The Sea Turtle Conservancy, formerly known as the Caribbean Conservation Corporation, is dedicated to protecting sea turtles through research, education, advocacy and protection of their habitats. Founded in 1959 to support the sea turtle research of Dr. Archie Carr, CCC is the oldest sea turtle research and conservation group in the world. Use this site to learn about sea turtles and find out how you can get involved and help protect sea turtles.

U.S. Geological Survey Newsroom Press Release – Nesting Gulf Sea Turtles Feed in Waters Filled With Threats
Press release from the U.S. Geological Survey Newsroom about the July 2014 publication of an article by Dr. Kristan Hart and Dr. Margaret M. Lamont on the threats to nesting Gulf of Mexico sea turtles in their feeding grounds. From the press release: “The study began in the wake of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill as a means to better understand how sea turtles used habitat in the Northern Gulf of Mexico by analyzing the movements of turtles tagged between 2010 and 2013.” The study, Migration, foraging, and residency patterns for Northern Gulf of Mexico loggerheads: Implications of local threats and international movements” was recently published in the journal PLOS ONE.

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